Learning Spaces: Part Forethought, Part Frivolity

As an illustrious tutor/substitute/paraprofessional at Lawrence High School, I have yet to truly lay claim to my own classroom space yet, but I am just ITCHING for that sweet sweet day.  Because I have some pretty badass classroom decor ideas, if I do say so myself.

I know that everyone learns differently, but, for me, the space I am in plays a major role in how I learn.  My belief is that a stimulating, comfortable, and academic-feeling (definitely a real thing) classroom environment sets a tone for the students that enter.  I would like my classroom to set a tone of creativity, appreciation for beauty and peace, respect for work that has gone before ours, celebration of the work that we create and the different learning styles represented, and a certain reverence for reading and discovery. In my ideal and totally wishful world, my classroom would feel like some vintage and cosmopolitan library in which a mad scientist was storing up all her findings about life as it is and was and has been.

As any studious, dedicated, and partially insane future-teacher would, I obviously started a Pinterest board for this momentous future event.  I’ve included some of the highlights below, but I would LOVE to hear from current or aspiring teachers on your experiences with classroom design, how you see it affect your students, and what you have done that you feel worked!

And now, for my unrealistic classroom decor dreams that I will work with irrational dedication to achieve:

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Because the more globes you have, the smarter your students are, right?

Because the more globes you have, the smarter your students are, right?

I am weirdly convinced that writing in chalk on a board framed with reclaimed wood would inspire some pretty beautiful thoughts.

I am weirdly convinced that writing in chalk on a board framed with reclaimed wood would inspire some pretty beautiful thoughts.

My dream is to have a very inviting and relaxing reading space.

My dream is to have a very inviting and relaxing reading space.

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4 thoughts on “Learning Spaces: Part Forethought, Part Frivolity

  1. Megan says:

    These are some mighty beautiful dream classrooms. I love the idea of having a space for quiet reading. Speaking from my own experience as a student, having the right space to work in is so critical. I get annoyed with people talking too loudly in the library for heavens sake. So it is only fair we try to provide an environment that is conducive to our own students’ learning! I didn’t have a Pinterest board for dream classrooms before this, but now I will!

    Like

  2. Danah Rae says:

    Haha, my Classroom Pinterest board is one of my faaaaaves! I feel the same way, though. The space I am in when learning plays a big role for me. I also feel like a very intentional and cared for space sends a specific rhetorical message to students. It communicates thought, planning, respect for education, and care for their experiences. I would ideally like my class to be a place that not only encourages learning, but communicates to students that they are important, valued, and worthy of high quality instruction.

    Like

  3. M.P. Carver says:

    I think the globes especially are a good idea! I didn’t get much by way of geography education (I think I had to memorize the countries of Europe at one time) and it was a huge problem when I got into college (I was an East Asian Studies major). Of course eventually I just taught myself (I highly recommend http://www.sporcle.com/games/g/world) but it would have helped if I had gone in with a better sense of the world as a whole! I also like the way the globes in that second picture are mismatched. It gives a sense of homeyness for sure.

    Like

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